Sunday, June 6, 2021

My Uncle on D-Day.....

 Taking a break from radio to post this.

I'm not sure where my Dad was on D-Day, other than "Somewhere In The South Pacific", but I do know where my Uncle Clarence was. Uncle Clarence, or as we called him, "Uncle Diddi" (NO idea where the nickname came from) was. 

I'm sure this picture will give you a pretty good idea.

As far as I was told many years ago, he went in the night before (the midnight insertions), but I don't know if he parachuted in, or went in a glider. He has his jump wings, but I didn't know about the glider patches until my cousin posted this picture. And knowing very little about WWII Army uniforms, I don't know what the blue "stripe" on his cap is called, or is for, or the "halo" around his jump wings is for.

Update - The Blue stripe signifies he was Infantry. The red background of the "Airborne" patch, and parachute patch, indicate he was in the "Command Division", which probably goes along with his rank. It also explains why there's just a glider and parachute on the patch instead of a specific Division marking, like the Screaming Eagles, 82nd Airborne, and the others had.

I also didn't know he was a Sergeant before. Can't tell if there's rocker there or not, and I don't know what rank he mustered out with.


I'm very happy my cousin posted her pictures, and I'll have to bug my sister about what she has left of Dad's things. I never knew much about where he was in the vast PTO, except that he island-hopped along with the Marines and Army.


I am profoundly grateful and eternally indebted to the Greatest Generation for their service, sacrifice, and example.


May God Bless you all, and may you spend eternity close to Him.


10 comments:

  1. Amen! I woke up this morning thinking about this day in 1944. Fortunately, my father returned after the war but many did not.

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    1. My Dad had four brothers, and they all went down to enlist on December 8th. One was too old, one worked for the railroad and was told he had a vital job "For The Duration", and to go home. My Dad wanted to go in the Navy, but found out he was color-blind, and since he was an apprentice machinist, they sent him down the hall and the Seabees grabbed him. His other two brothers went in the Army, and one brother did something he couldn't talk about, and Uncle Clarence wound up in the Airborne.

      And thank the Lord, they all came home. A bit worse for the wear, but home.

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  2. For whatever reason, the High Commanders looked down on the glider forces and they received little recognition for their bravery.

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    1. Ditto on the glider PILOTS. I can't imagine taking one of those crates into combat, and landing after dark, in unknown territory.

      My courage pales beside theirs...

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  3. My dad was there, but not in the first wave. My friend Nate was there but his landing craft got stuck on a sandbar. I hope you tell us what you find out about the markings on your uncle's uniform.

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    1. I just noticed the patches on his uniform today, and the cap, too. I'll scratch around a bit. I'm sure there's more than a few WWII US Army uniforms and markings site!

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  4. "he went in the night before (the midnight insertions)"
    So he was a Pathfinder, which means he jumped in. He has jump wings, early in the war there were no glider wings and IIRC the "glider gang" did not go to jump school or wear jump wings.
    Legend has it that they would have a silver dollar sewn in behind the patch on the garrison cap, as an emergency stash, and to use as a blunt instrument during bar fights...
    This looks like a posed "glamour shot", so the "Airborne Command" patch is not a definitive indication as to his actual assignment on June 6th, 1944.

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    1. Thanks, Drang! I remember the term "Pathfinder", but didn't connect it with his service.

      Yes, it's definitely a glamour shot. My Dad had one similar in his Navy uniform.

      I'll have to ask my cousin if she has any more documentation. My sister says she has all of Dad's stuff, but she hasn't responded about getting me copies. I'd like to trace his service with the SeaBees, but I'd need to know what group he served with.

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Keep it civil, please....