Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Antipodal Map

The other day somebody asked me how "far" I could "talk" using Amateur Radio.

The obvious answer was half-way around the world, depending on band conditions.

So then I started thinking (I know, a sometimes dangerous thing with me), where, exactly, was "Half Way Around The World"?

Well, the point that's "half-way around the world" from wherever you are is called The Antipode, and of course, there's an app for that:



It's a pretty neat little webpage, and it's located here.

4 comments:

  1. Thanks for that.

    I was pondering this the other day while trying to work the Cocos-Keeling and Barely Heard DXpeditions. They're not at my antipode, but are kinda close, with Cocos-Keeling being closer. For the antipode, you can point your antenna in any direction and be beaming there, so as a target gets closer to the antipode, beam heading makes less difference. Most HF antennas don't have much azimuth sensitivity anyway, especially smaller antennas, so beam heading just doesn't matter very much.

    But I had my best luck on 30m where I just have a single vertical.

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  2. That's a neat map! I'm somewhere out in the Indian Ocean off Madagascar...

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  3. The Navy used to get 'comms checks' with itself... :-)

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  4. Way back when I had a serious antenna up at 70', I'd be working stations on "short path", and hear myself coming back on "long path".

    It's unusual, but when propagation is "right", it does happen....

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Keep it civil, please....