Friday, September 28, 2018

Forty Degrees and Raining.....Beginning Winter Preps

And we started bringing up the heaters after I vacuumed the dust and other stuff out of them. The new heater I installed down in the basement is working fine, and now the chill in that room is gone. From some reason, I get creepy feelings down there at night, so I'll see if this makes that space more user friendly.

I pulled the vent piping out of the window and took it apart for the portable A/C unit in the guest room, collapsed the hose, and stowed it all in the room's closet. We're not expecting any visitors for a while, and we won't need the A/C in that room. And removing the vent allows us to fully close that window, making that room "winterized".

I haven't drained and coiled up the garden hoses and put the 'freeze protectors' back on the outdoor spigots yet, but that's coming Real Soon Now.

One of the things I'm planning on doing before winter really sets in is to get some sheets of the R-13 foam board from Home Depot. One sheet will go in between the storm door and original exit door in the garage, and the other sheet will get sectioned up so I can put pieces of it in the basement windows. If I cut them to fit snugly, it should cut down on the heat loss through the windows, and keep the basement warmer with less energy input. We have a quote from Renewal by Andersen to replace these windows, but it was deemed "Not Critical At This Time" by SWMBO, so they're still the aluminum framed Heat Pipes like we had topside in the rest of the house.

Same with the garage doors. Even though there's a volume of 'dead air' trapped between the two doors, there's still significant heat loss out of that portal. I'd planned on replacing the 40 year old side door in the garage (it's half glass, the glue joints are popped open, and it's sagging) this last summer, but never got one of those circular tuits from the jobjar to handle it. It's not as bad as the original aluminum framed windows we had replaced, but if you step into that corner of the garage you find yourself in a "cold spot". And I'm also thinking of putting four sheets of some thinner stuff across the garage door on the Toyota side. Even though the doors are insulated, and extra couple of inches can't hurt. It was getting down to 40 degrees in the garage last winter, and my "log" shows 10 nights at temps below 45. When it gets under 50 out there, it starts to get hard to work more than about 30~45 minutes. Even when I was huffing and puffing scrubbing out the paint last year, under 50 was sure to make my fingers stiffen up. I *might* look into some supplemental heat if I can do it inexpensively. Since there's NO natural gas piping on this cul-de-sac, hanging a big old Modine heater on the ceiling is out, thanks to Jimmuh Cahter.

Halloween preps this year (we closed on the house 31 October last year) include one of those little stick-in-the-ground "laser" light shows, a flicker bulb replacement for the porch light, some flickering plastic pumpkins on the porch, and a couple of speakers on the front porch playing spooky music. Oh, and four big bags of candy, per our neighbors.

Snow tire swap is scheduled for sometime in mid-November, as that's when most of the tribe does it, and they've lived here for quite a bit longer than we have.

I had these things on the list for October, but waking up to sub-40 degree temps, and then the drizzle, reminded me that there's no time like the present.

Oh, and I want to get a Farmer's Almanac this year, too. I haven't had one since high-school, but Mom put a lot of faith in their forecasts.

Must be a Midwestern thing.......

10 comments:

  1. Insulating my garage door with 1 inch foam board made a huge difference. I'm sure covering your basement windows will help too. To 'take the chill off' I've got a couple of ceramic heaters that plug in to the wall. Not exactly cheap to run, but they put out a lot of heat and you can aim the blower at your work area. I've got a big kerosene heater for my shop but haven't used it since I left Cali... For outdoor I've got the Mr Buddy for the top of a propane tank. It is awesome for pointing some heat at something.

    zuk

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    1. These are the standard "insulated" doors they use out here. Judging from the openers they installed, I'd say they're "Top of the (Home Depot) Line" doors. I'll be taking the car out of the garage once more this year to pressure wash the engine bay and get the spots I missed, and then she's going back in, and I'll put the foam up then.

      I have to watch my power budget carefully, as I've only got one 15Amp breaker for all the outlets, one reason I went with LED lighting.

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  2. I don't know how the Farmer's Almanac does it, but they've called it right for a very long time.

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    1. I'll look for one the next time I'm out and about.

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  3. It may sound stupid, but one of those industrial rubber cushion mats for you to stand on in the garage will help cut down on the heat loss through your feet, even though you will be wearing shoes and socks.

    Weird how cold just seeps into your feet and you'll not notice it.

    You might also get some pressure treated plywood to put over the outside of the windows in the basement. Cutting down on exposing the frame will help. A friend of mine up north puts PT plywood covers with foam on the outside of all of his not-used old-school windows and he says it helps a ton. Anything blocking the wind will help a load.

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    1. Not stupid at all, Beans! I picked up a set of mats from Harbor Fright the other day, and I'll be putting them down soon.

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  4. Colorado has seen some epic blizzards in October so preparing now isn't foolish.

    Today I was considering the impact of the cooler weather. Yesterday I drove a 270 mile loop via Sterling and it was hot. Realized today the comely female residents of this apartment complex will be putting away short shorts and tank tops. Sad. Yes, I'm a dirty old man.

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    1. Over this way we have all the college girls putting on more layers!

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  5. Our basement windows are aluminum framed and louvered and you put either a screen insert or a single pane glass window on the inside depending on the season.
    We stuffed the space between with insulation and haven't ever gotten around to removing the insulation for summer.

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    1. I might leave it in the front room downstairs, but I'll probably pull it from the big "egress" window in the back room once the weather warms up.

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Keep it civil, please....